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High Blood Pressure and African Americans

The rate of high blood pressure in African Americans is among the highest of any ethnic group in the U.S. Learn why and find out how to change your lifestyle to lower your blood pressure.

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Help for the Holiday Blues

The holiday blues can range from mild sadness to severe depression, and they are often a normal reaction to life situations.

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Buying Guidelines for Safe and Fun Toys

Learn which toys make good gifts, and which toys to skip this holiday season.

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3 Tactics to Help Prevent Depression

Have a glass of low-fat milk, get regular exercise, and download an app—all of these may help you keep depression at bay.

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WELLNESS CENTER
Smoking Cessation
Smoking Cessation
You’ve heard all the reasons to stop smoking. You may have thought about quitting or even tried it a time or two. But you may need a little help. Learn how to get ready to quit, how to quit, and how to stay quit for a healthier, smoke-free future.
Asthma
Asthma
Are you all too familiar with the coughing and wheezing that remind you that you have asthma? Asthma can be a serious problem, but it doesn’t have to stop you in your tracks. With the help of your health care team, you can keep your asthma under control.
Children's Health
Children's Health
You want the best for your child, from good nutrition to effective discipline to a breadth of life opportunities.
    INTERACTIVE TOOLS

    How much do you really know about those fat globules lurking in your food? Take this quiz and find out.

    BMI, or body mass index, uses weight and height to calculate weight status for adults. BMI for children and teens also takes into account gender and age because healthy body fatness differs between boys and girls and changes as they grow. This BMI calculator will help you determine if your child is at a healthy weight.

    Cancer of the colon or rectum (colorectal cancer) usually develops slowly, over several years. Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). Still, the death rate from colorectal cancer has been dropping for the last 15 years because of better detection and treatment. Take this simple assessment to learn about your risks for colorectal cancer.

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